Jorge Montoya

Jorge has been reading about Drupal and playing with it for almost 5 years. He likes it very much! He also likes to translate German and English documents into Spanish. He's lived in some places. Right now, he lives in the city of Medellín in his homeland Colombia with his wife and son.

Create Dropdown Menus using Superfish in Drupal 8

The Superfish module allows you to create multi-level dropdown menus in Drupal 8. The module uses the JavaScript Superfish library to create and display a Superfish menu block for each menu available on your site.

With a few configuration options, you can control how it’ll behavior on mobile, turn multi-column menus, change the styling and more.

The module does come with a few styling options but you’ll have to style it yourself to match your theme. When you configure Superfish the first time the dropdown functionality will, however, it may not look good.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to install the module and how to configure it.

Display Blocks within Content pages using Block Field in Drupal 8

The Block field module lets you insert a Drupal block as a field on your content.

A Drupal theme is divided into regions and you can place blocks or your own custom blocks into these regions. You accomplish this task by dragging and ordering blocks in the “Block Layout” screen. That means you can append blocks before or after the main content of your content type. This “Block Layout” screen will soon be cluttered if you have multiple content types and/or multiple single nodes, each one with a different custom block.

However, there’s a way to insert a block (or many blocks) directly into your content as a field. Thus, you don’t have to place the block in the “Block Layout” screen, instead, you insert the block as a field on the node.

In this tutorial, we’re going to cover the usage of the Block field module. Let’s start!

Create Individual Registration Forms using Multiple Registration in Drupal 8

If a user needs to create an account on a Drupal site, they go to the user registration page at “/user/register”. This page is the registration form on a Drupal site. You can customize it by adding or removing fields. But what if you want to have multiple registration pages?

Let’s say you have two different roles on your Drupal site and you need a separate form for each role. How would you build that?

You could handle all of this writing custom code but remember we’re using Drupal so means there’s a module that can handle this type of functionality and It’s called Multiple Registration.

The Multiple Registration module allows you to create individual registration forms base off a user role in Drupal. When you register on one of the forms, you’re automatically assigned the configured role.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to use Multiple Registration to create individual registration forms.

How to Add Menus using Toolbar Menu in Drupal 8

With the Toolbar Menu module, you can add as many menus as you need to the toolbar of your Drupal installation. By default, a Drupal 8 installation has 3 menu links in its toolbar.

1. Manage – Administration of the whole Drupal site, 2. Shortcuts – Links added by the admin to administrative pages used frequently, 3. User Name – Link to the profile page

This module works also with the Admin Toolbar module, which improves the default toolbar providing dropdown menus. In this tutorial, we’re going to cover the usage of the Toolbar Menu module.

Easily Link to Content using Linkit in Drupal 8

The Linkit module allow site editors to work in a more comfortable way when linking to internal entities (i.e. content, users, taxonomy terms, files, comments, etc.) and when linking to external content as well.

The benefit of the module is that your editors won’t have to copy and paste URLs of content they’re linking to, instead the module provides an autocomplete field, which they can use to search for content.

Linkit works based on a profile system. You can choose as many or as few plugins (linking options) for each profile and then assign each profile to a particular text format. This provides an extra layer of granularity, because the linking permissions are granted in the text editor and not within Linkit. That way you can add multiple roles or just one role to a Linkit profile.

Differentiate Websites using Environment Indicator in Drupal 8

As a web developer, you probably build your sites first in a local environment (aka localhost), then you commit all your changes to a staging server (i.e. an online server to which only you or the development team has access) and if everything works fine in the staging server, you’ll commit these changes to a production or live server (that’s your online site).

However, you don’t have a way to differentiate between your local, your staging and your production environments apart from the address box of your browser, so it’s very easy to mix up everything and that could lead to complications. The worst case scenario is making changes directly to your live site without testing and breaking it. In order to prevent this, you can use the Environment Indicator module.

The Environment Indicator module adds a visual hint to your site, that way you’ll always be aware of the environment you’re working on. We’re going to cover installation and usage of this module in this tutorial.

Let’s start!