Manage URL Redirects using Redirect module in Drupal 8

The ability to create and maintain redirects on a website is vital for long-term success.

Once your site has a lot of content, you may need to do a content audit. This will require merging or deleting pages which are no longer important. To maintain the traffic from these deleted or merged pages, you’ll need to create URL redirects. Now I understand this isn’t the most exciting part of site building but it’s important to get it right.

The module which will handle all of this is perfectly name; Redirect.

The Redirect module lets you create and manage redirects using a simple user interface. Just define a source and destination and you’re good to go. You can also track 404 errors, using a sub-module, so if you have a page indexed in Google with a broken path then it’ll be logged and a redirect can be easily created.

Add Custom Tab to User Profile Page with Views in Drupal 8

On a recent project, I had to create a custom page which displays content by the logged in user, think of it as a “My articles” or “My blogs” page. I knew how to do it by writing code but I thought I’d try it with Views and see how far I could get without writing any custom code. Long story short, I was able to do it all by using just the Views module.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to create a page which will appear as a tab (local task) on the user profile page.

Getting Started

For once there are no extra modules to download and install. In Drupal 8, Views ships with core and will be automatically installed if you installed Drupal using the Standard installation profile.

If it’s not already installed, go to Extend and install Views and “Views UI”.

How to Use Webform Predefined Options in Drupal 8

Webform allows you to create powerful forms in Drupal without writing any custom code. One feature I want to show you today is predefined options.

Predefined options ease the creation of forms by offering common lists such as days, months, time zones, titles, etc…

For example, if you want to add a select list where users choose a country, instead of manually entering in all countries yourself, use the predefined one that comes with the module.

Webform comes with around 30 predefined lists which can be added to radio buttons, checkboxes, select list and menus. You can also create your own.

If you have a website that will use the same set of options on multiple forms, look at creating a predefined options list to save time.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to create and use predefined options.

How to Implement Layouts using Bootstrap Layouts in Drupal 8

If you’re planning to use Bootstrap on your Drupal 8 site, the first obvious thing to do is download and set up the Bootstrap theme. Then, during the site building process, there will come the point where you need to create a few layouts. These layouts could be used for content types with Display Suite, or for custom pages using Panels.

Implementing layouts using the Bootstrap grid system is simple thanks to the Bootstrap Layouts module.

Bootstrap Layouts is a module that ships a bunch of prebuilt layouts using the grid system in Bootstrap. Best of all, these layouts can be used between Display Suite and Panels, or any module which supports the Layout Discovery module

The layouts are configurable through Drupal’s administrative UI. For example, you can adjust the width of a two column layout by choosing grid CSS classes from a multi-select field.

Getting Started with Bootstrap in Drupal 8

Bootstrap is a front-end framework for building websites. It ships prebuilt CSS and JavaScript components that make building sites fast. It comes with all sorts of common components that every website needs such as a grid system, buttons, drop-down, responsive form elements, carousel (of course) and so much more. As a developer I don’t want to spend time styling yet another button. I just want to know which CSS class to add to an “a” tag so it looks like a button and I’m good to go.

One complaint about Bootstrap is you can spot it a mile away because a lot of developers use the default look-and-feel. When you see the famous Jumbotron you know it’s a Bootstrap site. But with a little bit of effort you can make your site look unique.

Moving Forward with Webform in Drupal 8

In part two of our Webform tutorial, we’ll show you how to create multipage forms, apply conditional logic, create layouts and much more!

We’ll take the simple newsletter signup form created in part one of this tutorial and add additional pages. Then we’ll demonstrate how to show or hide an element depending on the selection made on another element. We’ll also look at layouts and then finish off with an overview of some of the other great features Webform has to offer.

For forms with many elements, it’s best to spread them across two or more pages. In this section, we’ll take the form we created in part one and move some of the elements to make a two page form. We’ll also add a preview page and make changes to the confirmation screen.

Getting Started with Webform in Drupal 8

The Webform module in Drupal 8 makes it easy to create complex forms in no time. The basics are easy to learn but when you start digging below the surface, the huge power of the Webform module starts to reveal itself.

While the Contact module in Drupal 8 core does allow you to create simple personal and site-wide contact forms, functionality is limited. This is where Webform module steps in.

In the first part of this tutorial, we’ll use some Webform elements to create a simple but fully functioning form. We’ll show what you can do with the results of submissions and then add some additional elements. We’ll also demonstrate how one of the built-in JavaScript libraries can improve the look of form elements.

In part two, we’ll add additional pages to our Webform, apply conditional logic, show how to create great layouts and much more!

How to Create Forms using Webform and Contact in Drupal 8

The ability to create a form quickly and easily is a vital piece of functionality in any content management system. A content editor needs the capacity to create a form and add or remove fields.

The days of asking a developer to create a custom form are long gone. An editor should be able to spin up a form for whatever they need.

Luckily Drupal 8 has two good options for building forms: Contact and Webform.

How to Programmatically Create a Block in Drupal 8

Blocks, as the name suggests, are pieces of content that can be placed anywhere on your Drupal site. They can contain simple text, forms or something with complex logic.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to create a block using custom code and how to use Drupal Console to generate it. If you’ve used blocks in Drupal 7 then you will be familiar with the new interface in Drupal 8. If you’re a site builder, the whole process of creating, editing and deleting a block is very intuitive.

Before jumping into code, let’s talk about the Drupal Block UI and understand what has changed since Drupal 7.

How to Customize Content Forms and Pages Using Field Group in Drupal 8

Content with many fields can be overwhelming when it comes to adding and editing data. Also, creating layouts to display the content is often a complex task. Field Group can solve both of these issues.

Using this module, fields can be grouped in a variety of ways including tabs, accordions and HTML elements. Field Group not only works for editing content, it can also be used to group and structure fields so that great layouts can be created with little effort.

In the first part of this tutorial, we’ll show how to group fields to make editing content easier. The second part will demonstrate how to display groups of fields to create a simple but effective layout.