Bootstrap

Getting Started with Bootstrap in Drupal 8

Bootstrap is a front-end framework for building websites. It ships prebuilt CSS and JavaScript components that make building sites fast. It comes with all sorts of common components that every website needs such as a grid system, buttons, drop-down, responsive form elements, carousel (of course) and so much more. As a developer I don’t want to spend time styling yet another button. I just want to know which CSS class to add to an “a” tag so it looks like a button and I’m good to go.

One complaint about Bootstrap is you can spot it a mile away because a lot of developers use the default look-and-feel. When you see the famous Jumbotron you know it’s a Bootstrap site. But with a little bit of effort you can make your site look unique.

Getting Started with Bootstrap 4 using Radix in Drupal 8

Radix is a Bootstrap 4 powered theme which is set up out-of-the-box to compile the Bootstrap library locally. It is targeted towards advance front-end developers who want total control on how Bootstrap is loaded and comes with Browsersync and Font Awesome built-in. The theme doesn’t support loading Bootstrap via a CDN out-of-the-box. I’d recommend you look at the Barrio theme if you prefer to load everything through a CDN.

Because you’re compiling Bootstrap, you get the added benefit of being able to modify the _variables.scss which is used to customize Bootstrap and can control what SASS components get imported. By importing only what you need you can drastically reduce the size of the compiled CSS file.

The theme comes with a Drush command (Drush 8 only), drush radix "Theme name", which makes it easy to generate sub-themes. The sub-theme comes with a package.json which has all the required packages.

Just run npm install, then npm run dev to compile Bootstrap. It uses laravel-mix to compile everything so you don’t have to spend time configuring webpack files.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to install Radix, create a sub-theme, how to compiling everything and learn about Radix Layouts.

Getting Started with Bootstrap 4 using Barrio in Drupal 8

Bootstrap is a powerful front-end framework which helps you build sites and web applications faster by offering prebuilt CSS and JavaScript components.

Some of the CSS components it offers are a grid system, buttons, navigation, jumbotron and so much more. On the JavaScript side, it comes with a few useful items such as a modal, collapsible divs, carousel to name a few. Read the Bootstrap documentation to find out more.

Bootstrap in Drupal

If you search for “drupal bootstrap” in Google, the first result will likely be the Bootstrap theme. This theme is the most popular on drupal.org with over 150,000 reported installs. But as of this writing, the theme only supports Bootstrap 3, not version 4 which is the latest.

So if you want to use Bootstrap 4 you’ll need to use another theme until the Bootstrap theme supports version 4.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to configure and use the Drupal 8 version of the Barrio theme which uses Bootstrap 4.

How to Implement Layouts using Bootstrap Layouts in Drupal 8

If you’re planning to use Bootstrap on your Drupal 8 site, the first obvious thing to do is download and set up the Bootstrap theme. Then, during the site building process, there will come the point where you need to create a few layouts. These layouts could be used for content types with Display Suite, or for custom pages using Panels.

Implementing layouts using the Bootstrap grid system is simple thanks to the Bootstrap Layouts module.

Bootstrap Layouts is a module that ships a bunch of prebuilt layouts using the grid system in Bootstrap. Best of all, these layouts can be used between Display Suite and Panels, or any module which supports the Layout Discovery module

The layouts are configurable through Drupal’s administrative UI. For example, you can adjust the width of a two column layout by choosing grid CSS classes from a multi-select field.

Display Bootstrap Components using Views Bootstrap

Bootstrap is a mobile first front-end framework that allows a developer to build websites quickly. The framework comes with a lot of reusable CSS styles, components and jQuery plugins.

One thing I like about Bootstrap is its CSS styles and components. You get access to all sorts of useful things like Tables, Thumbnails and more.

Now, implementing these components in Drupal can be tough. You can either change Drupal’s markup or use Mixins.

But there is a module that can help you display components (and some plugins) within a View; and it’s called Views Bootstrap.

The module allows you to use components and CSS styles directly from the Views edit page without overriding templates or creating mixins.

In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to create a “Recent articles” block using Views and the Media object component.